Risk, Fear & Worry

Original post | by Seth Godin


They’re not the same.

Risk is all around us. When we encounter potential points of failure, we’re face to face with risk. And nothing courts risk more than art, the desire to do something for the first time–to make a difference.

Fear is a natural reaction to risk. While risk is real and external, fear exists only in our imagination. Fear is the workout we give ourselves imagining what will happen if things don’t work out.

And worry? Worry is the hard work of actively (and mentally) working against the fear. Worry is our effort to imagine every possible way to avoid the outcome that is causing us fear, and failing that, to survive the thing that we fear if it comes to fruition.

If you’ve persuaded yourself that risk is sufficient cause for fear, and that fear is sufficient cause for worry, you’re in for some long nights and soon you’ll abandon your art out of exhaustion. On the other hand, you can choose to see the three as completely separate phenomena, and realize that it’s possible to have risk (a good thing) without debilitating fear or its best friend, obsessive worry.

Separate first, eliminate false causation, then go ahead and do your best work.

Advertisements

About gabulmer

Christian apologist, husband, father, runner, blogger, leader with LIFE Leadership.
This entry was posted in Leadership. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Risk, Fear & Worry

  1. gabulmer says:

    Note to self: follow up to “Feet on the Street”, & tailor for TEAM/LIFE
    ______________________________________________________
    Feet on the street

    The complement to the brilliant strategy is the thankless work of lower-leverage detail.

    An organization with feet on the street and alert and regular attention to detail can build more trust and develop better relationships than one than hits and runs.

    Contact every user who stops using your service and find out why.
    Create a newsletter for every journalist who covers your space, and deliver it every three weeks, even when you’re not asking for anything. Just to keep them in the loop.
    Eagerly pay attention to people who mention you online and engage with them in a way that they prefer to be engaged.
    Sponsor industry events and actually show up.
    Write a thank you note every single day, to someone who doesn’t expect one.
    Build your permission asset by 1% every day. Every day, 1% more people are eager and happy to hear from you.
    Write a blog every day, not to sell, but to teach.
    Connect people in your industry, because you enjoy it.
    Host community meetings in your store.
    Put a lemonade stand in front of your business and let the local kids donate the money to whatever charity they like.
    Hand out free samples every chance you have.
    Keep in touch with people who used to work with you and continue to help them get great gigs and new business, even years later.
    Put together an honest buyer’s guide, pointing out in which instances your competitor’s products are a better choice.
    Run classes for your customers.
    Run classes for your competitors.
    Build a recruiting pipeline that is in place more than a year before you need to hire someone.

    None of this is sufficient. Your product and your strategy have to be brilliant. But a lot of it is necessary. Hearts and minds…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s