And Justice For All

Posted by Orrin Woodward on April 30, 2014

I am so excited to be finally releasing the first of a trilogy of books on the never-ending power-struggle between the State and Society in human history. And Justice for All will be released at the LIFE Leadership Major LadyLibertyConvention in Columbus Ohio in June. I am so thankful to the LIFE Leaders who have blessed me with their friendship, thoughts, and suggestions to make this book better.

A special thanks to my amazing wife Laurie Woodward and our two youngest sons (Lance and Jeremy) for participating in our family discussions upon the concepts in this book. I have experienced first-hand the growth of these two teenager of their knowledge of the roles of the State and Society. 

Here is a short segment from the book to illustrate the power of ideas in one’s life.

Sincerely,

Orrin Woodward

Author Warren T. Brookes captures how the duality within human nature and methods for creating wealth has led to a division within the science of economics as well:

One view, defined by Adam Smith and Jean-Baptist Say, is that wealth is primarily metaphysical, the results of ideas, imagination, innovation, and individual creativity, and is therefore, relatively speaking, unlimited, susceptible to great growth and development . . . After all, if wealth truly is metaphysical, the result more of mind than matter, the “wealth of nations” has to be seen as the direct result of the creative activity of individuals and the degree to which that activity is either liberated or restricted by governmental, trade, or societal structures and strictures . . . The other, espoused by Thomas Malthus and Karl Marx, contends that wealth is essentially and primarily physical, and therefore ultimately finite. The modern presentation of this view argues that since usable energy is steadily diminishing into entropy, all wealth is really cost to be shared more equitably . . .  If one believes that wealth is primarily a function of material resources, and is therefore limited (or declining), it is only natural that one would see the role of economic policy as the just and collective conservation, distribution, and redistribution of these limited resources until the end is reached.

Smith and Say believe wealth is metaphysical, and since ideas are unlimited, society should employ the “economics means” of wealth creation to raise the tide of humanity and its societal ships. In contrast, Malthus and Marx believe wealth is physical, and since resources are limited, society should employ the “political means” of wealth expropriation to direct the tide equitably between societal ships. This divergence in economic thought relates back to the divergence in methods to create wealth which tracks back to the divergence within man himself.

One of the key objectives of this book is to educate leaders in the systematic interactions between these two opposing forces within society.  For only when this is understood can we achieve long lasting concord within society.  Towards that end, there are three questions that must be answered in order to achieve enduring concord within society.

  1. What areas of society prosper best under liberty and persuasion?

  2. What is the proper role of government within society to ensure justice for all?

  3. How does society check government’s “monopoly of force” from expanding BillOfRightsinto areas it doesn’t belong?

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About gabulmer

Christian apologist, husband, father, runner, blogger, leader with LIFE Leadership.
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