The Financial Matrix

The Financial Matrix, like the fictitious Matrix in the film, is a system of governmental money control designed to keep people in bondage to debt (control the flow of capital & you control the masses & a culture of borrowing).

This seven minute video peels back a few layers of the onion and, more importantly, offers real-time solutions.

The Financial Matrix 2

 

The Financial Matrix

Red or Blue

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LLR Corporate Subscription overview

LLR Corporate Development

The LLR Corporate Development Program (overview)

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4 Ways Leaders can Construct their Lives for the Long Haul

April 10, 2018 By Eric Geiger | Original

The headline of The Ringer article successfully grabbed my attention: “LeBron James’s Life Is Constructed to Keep Him on the Court.” And the details in the article from the podcast are fascinating, such as the statement that LeBron invests 1.5M a year in his body. He has replicated the team gym at his home, has multiple trainers, multiple chefs, masseuses, and understands the science on how to sleep. “Everything he does in his lifeConquer Self is constructed to have him play basketball and to stay on the court and to be as healthy as possible.” And the results are staggering. He is playing some of his best, if not the best basketball of his career as a thirteen-year veteran.

What does LeBron’s 1.5M-a-year fitness regime have to do with leaders? A lot, actually. Because he loves the game so much and is committed to playing at a high level, he is committed to investing in himself. He is committed to putting his body through grueling workouts instead of simply celebrating what he has already accomplished. Like LeBron, leaders must value their health more than their comfort. No, you likely don’t have 1.5 million you can invest in yourself, but you still must invest in yourself. Leaders must construct their lives for the long haul. Here are four ways to do so. (None of this is original or new … but it is important.)

  1. Invest in yourself physically

You don’t have to be a health nut and gym rat to be a leader, but you should invest in yourself physically if you want to lead for the long haul. Exercise, eating healthy, and healthy sleep patterns are proven to give you more energy and mental clarity. It costs money to invest in yourself physically. New running shoes, a gym membership, and eating healthy are not cheap. But they are cheaper than the cost of not taking care of yourself physically.

  1. Invest in yourself mentally

Whether taking classes, attending conferences, or reading books, investing in yourself mentally is an investment. It costs. And even if the resources are free, time is required. But if you stop learning, you will eventually stop leading.

  1. Invest in yourself emotionally

The pressure on leaders will take a toll. If leaders don’t rest, the pressure compounds and leaders can become numb to others or lash out in anger. You must rest. You must find something that helps you recover emotionally.

  1. Invest in yourself spiritually

The apostle Paul told Timothy, the younger pastor he invested in: “Train yourself in godliness. For the training of the body has limited benefit, but godliness is beneficial in every way, since it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come” (1 Timothy 4:7-8). In other words, much more important than physical training is training yourself in godliness, in pursuing Christlikeness through the spiritual disciplines of the faith. We waste immense amounts of time in our lives, but prayer, reading the Scripture, fasting, gathering with other believers, and solitude and stillness are never a waste of time.

Plato said, “The first and best victory is to conquer self.” While leading self is the hardest person to lead, the better we are at leading ourselves, the better we will be at leading others. If we don’t invest in ourselves, we are not constructing our lives for the long run.
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Eric Geiger serves as a Senior Vice President at  LifeWay Christian Resources , leading the Resources Division.  Eric received his doctorate in leadership and church ministry from  Southern Seminary . Eric has authored or co-authored several books including Creature of the Word and the bestselling church leadership book, Simple Church. His latest releases are Designed to Lead and How to Ruin Your Life

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But What About the People who Don’t Care?

by Seth Godin

How do we work with someone who doesn’t seem to care?

I have a hard time believing that people can’t care. I think tI Dont Carehat they often don’t see. They don’t see what we see, or interpret it differently.  Or if they see, they see something you don’t see. But if they saw what you saw, and it was related to how they saw themselves, they’d act differently.

The gap is usually in the difficulty of getting the non-owner to see a path to happiness that comes as a result of acting like an owner. Most people are taught to avoid that feeling. Because it always comes with another feeling–

— the dread of responsibility.

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When Your Ideas get Stolen

(stolen from) by Seth Godin

A few meditations:

Good for you. Isn’t it better that your ideas are worth stealing? What would happen if you worked all that time, created that book or that movie or that concept and no one wanted to riff on it, expand it or run with it? Would that be better?Stolen Ideas2

You’re not going to run out of ideas. In fact, the more people grab your ideas and make magic with them, the more of a vacuum is sitting in your outbox, which means you will prompted to come up with even more ideas, right?

Ideas that spread win. They enrich our culture, create connection and improve our lives. Isn’t that why you created your idea in the first place?

The goal isn’t credit. The goal is change.
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Have fun, make money,make a difference; it’s the life you’ve always wanted!

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Digital Now, Transformation Later

We’ve recently made a strategic move to digital promotion (via audio & video). The delta (in terms of change in execution) is still lagging as the desire not to embrace the relatively new medium slowly recedes from the status quo.

I saw this article in Adweek & was semi-comforted to know that we’re not the only ones…

“For brands, digital transformation usually centers on optimizing the customer experience.”

by Dan Tynan, Adweek (excerpt) | February 25, 2018

When it comes to digital transformation, most brands have the digital side down. They’re using Adobe or Salesforce marketing cloud, Sprout or Sprinklr for social engagement, RedPoint Global or Segment to manage customer data, and so on. Hyper Speed

It’s the transformation that’s the hard part. Because it’s not just about having the right tools, it’s about having the right kind of organization, operating model, talent and mindset, says Jason Heller, partner and global lead for digital marketing operations and technology at McKinsey & Co.

“Most companies are technology rich but insight and execution poor,” he says. “They have the technology, they just aren’t using it properly.”

Full Article

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Did Jesus Actually Say That?

Culture is interesting. It often pushes back on what it does not understand – or on what doesn’t fit into the dominant or trending worldview – especially on “hot topic” issues.

I blog (obviously). I don’t currently Vlog (Video Blog). So this blog gives expression to the things I’d like to communicate; it’s my voice in written form. I’ve had discussions about one’s ‘Ontic Referent’ & have also written about it, hereWhat Jesus Said

I’ve often gotten involved in a theological conversation, especially in church, and mentioned “Oh, I just said that on my Apologetics Blog.” The other person knows it’s “in writing” – but it’s my writing – so I’ve “said” it . . . without speaking it.

That being said – I’ll sometimes get someone who says “Jesus never said that!” And, if they mean “never uttered those exact words” – they ’re technically correct. However, let’s look at the Gospel of John

John 1:1-4 The Word Became Flesh

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were created through Him, and without Him nothing was created that was created. 4 In Him was life, and the life was the light of mankind.

Jesus, “The Word” (another name for Jesus) became flesh). He (Jesus) is God & has been God from the beginning. All things, which would  include God’s Word (which is also Jesus’ Word) were created through Him.
So whether one is reading the written words of Jesus in the Old Testament – OR Jesus’ actual spoken words in the New Testament – one is reading the words of Jesus, a.k.a. the Word.

Often, Jesus did not directly address certain issues because they had already been addressed . . . in His Word within the Old Testament. There was therefore no need to repeat Himself.

Thus, regarding culture, be careful of the things you think Jesus didn’t say – because if it’s in the Bible . . . Jesus said it. He communicated it to us.

Period.

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The Bannister Method

Excellent strategy – @ LIFE Leadership, we label it ‘P.D.C.A‘ (Plan, Do, Check & Adjust)
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by Seth Godin

Roger Bannister did something that many people had said was impossible.

He ran a mile in four minutes.

The thing is, he didn’t accomplish this by running a mile as fast as he could. Bannister

He did it by setting out to run a mile in four minutes.

Bannister analyzed the run, stride by stride. He knew how long each split needed to be. He had colleagues work in a relay, pacing him on each and every section of the mile.

He did something impossible, but he did it by creating a series of possible steps.

It’s easy to get hung up on, “as possible.” As fast, as big, as much, as cheap, as small…

The Bannister Method is to obsess about “enough” instead.

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Five Marks of a Servant Leader

by LifeWay Leadership / Jon Bloom

All professing Christians agree that a Christian leader should be a servant leader. Jesus couldn’t be clearer:

“The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them, and those in authority over them are  called benefactors. But not so with you. Rather, let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves.”
Luke 22:25–26

Where there’s not always agreement is how servant leadership should look in a given situation. Sometimes servant leaders wash others’ feet, so to speak (John 13:1–17), but Bible + Coffeeother times they rebuke (Matthew 16:23), and even discipline (Matthew 18:15–20). Sometimes they serve at their own expense (1 Corinthians 9:7), but other times they issue strong imperatives (1 Corinthians 5:2; 11:16).

Wading into Muddy Waters

Other factors muddy the waters even more for us. To begin with, all Christian leaders have indwelling sin, which means even at the height of their maturity, they will still be defective servants. Add to this the fact that most leaders have not yet reached their height of maturity. Add to this the fact that all Christian followers also have indwelling sin and most haven’t reached our height of maturity either. Add to this the fact that different temperaments, experiences, giftings, and callings influence both how certain leaders tend to serve, and how certain followers tend to perceive that leadership — a leader’s genuine attempt to serve might be interpreted by a genuine follower as an attempt to “lord it over” them (2 Corinthians 1:24). And then there are wolfish, self-serving leaders who, while deceiving their followers, appear for a time to behave in ways similar to servant leaders.

So, determining whether or not a leader is acting from a heart of Christlike service requires charitable, patient, humble discernment. It’s not simple. There’s no one-size-fits-all servant leader description. The needs and contexts in the wider church are vast and varied, and require many different kinds of leaders and gifts. We must guard against our own unique biases when assessing leaders’ hearts. Each of us is more or less drawn to certain kinds of leaders, but our preferences can be unreliable and even uncharitable standards.

Marks of a Servant Leader

Still, the New Testament instructs us to exercise due diligence in discerning a Christian leader’s fitness (see, for instance, 1 Timothy 3:1–13). What traits do we look for in a leader that suggest his fundamental orientation is Christlike servanthood? This list is by no means exhaustive, but here are five fundamental indicators.

  1. A servant leader seeks the glory of his Master.

And his Master is not his reputation or his ministry constituency; it is God. Jesus said, “The one who speaks on his own authority seeks his own glory; but the one who seeks the glory of him who sent him is true, and in him there is no falsehood” (John 7:18). A Christlike leader is a bondservant of Christ (Ephesians 6:6), and demonstrates over time that Christ — not public approval, position, or financial security — has his primary loyalty. In this he “swears to his own hurt and does not change” (Psalm 15:4).

  1. A servant leader sacrificially seeks the highest joy of those he serves.

This does not conflict with seeking the glory of his Master. Jesus said, “Whoever would be great among you must be your servant . . . even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:26, 28). Whatever his temperament, gift mix, capacities, or sphere of influence, he will make necessary sacrifices in order to pursue people’s “progress and joy in the faith,” which results in the greater glory of God (Philippians 1:25; 2:9–11).

  1. A servant leader will forgo his rights rather than obscure the gospel.

Paul said it this way: “I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them” (1 Corinthians 9:19). What did this mean for him? It meant sometimes he abstained from certain foods and drinks, or refused financial support from those he served, or worked with his own hands to provide for himself, or went hungry, or dressed poorly, or was beaten, or was homeless, or endured disrespect inside and outside the church (1 Corinthians 4:11–13; 9:4–7). And he decided not to marry (1 Corinthians 9:5). This all before he was martyred. Paul’s servant bar may have been set extraordinarily high, but all servant leaders will yield their rights if they believe more will be won to Christ as a result.

  1. A servant leader is not preoccupied with personal visibility and recognition.

Like John the Baptist, a servant leader sees himself as a “friend of the Bridegroom” (John 3:29), and is not preoccupied with the visibility of his own role. He doesn’t view those with less visible roles as less significant, nor does he covet more visible roles as more significant (1 Corinthians 12:12–26). He seeks to steward the role he’s received as best he can, and gladly leaves the role assignments to God (John 3:27).

  1. A servant leader anticipates and graciously accepts the time for his decrease.

All leaders serve only for a season. Some seasons are long, some short; some are abundant, some lean; some are recorded and recalled, most are not. But all seasons end. When John the Baptist recognized the ending of his season, he said, “Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. He must increase, but I must decrease” (John 3:29–30).

Sometimes a leader is the first to recognize his season’s end, sometimes others recognize it first, and sometimes God lets a season end unjustly for purposes a leader can’t understand at the time. But a servant leader graciously yields his role for the good of Christ’s cause, because his identity and trust are not in his calling, but in his Christ.

Be Gracious with Your Leaders

No earthly Christian leader is the perfect incarnation of these five fundamental marks of servanthood. Jesus alone bears that distinction. The vast majority of our leaders are imperfect servants trying to be faithful.

So, some of the greatest gifts we can give our leaders are 1) our explicit encouragement when we see any of these graces in them (loose our tongues), 2) our quiet patience with their stumbling (hold our tongues), and 3) our charitable judgment and gracious feedback regarding decisions that raise questions and concerns (bridle our tongues). And all three can be as easily applied in speaking about our leaders as in speaking to them.

If a leader needs help recognizing the ending of his season, let his faithful friends bring a loving, gracious, gentle, and patient encouragement, and if necessary, reproof.

But sometimes, like Diotrephes (3 John 9), a leader’s sinful defects are too damaging, or like Judas (Luke 6:16), they prove to be a wolf. At that point a gracious response looks like appropriate, godly, mature followers taking the servant initiative to rebuke (Matthew 16:23), and even discipline (Matthew 18:15–20). We’ll know we’ve reached that point because, after a season of observation, it will become clear that these five marks are conspicuously missing in that leader.
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Originally published at Desiring God. Jon Bloom serves as board chair and co-founder of Desiring God and is the author of three books, Not by SightThings Not Seen, and Don’t Follow Your Heart.
Original:
http://www.lifeway.com/leadership/2017/12/06/five-marks-servant-leader/

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